SaintJoe H2O

Use the thread below as a gallery space for your visual chapter summary over Chapter 3, "Darwin In Paradise," from The Enchanted Braid- Coming to terms with nature on the coral reef. Remember, stick to the protocol. There is power in protocols, for they often force our thinking toward a more creative level. This, of course, seems ironic before trying...  but I think you'll soon see what I mean by that.

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As always, post a reflection of this challenge and comment both on how this helped you learn the content of this part of the book, as well as how the processes of the task contributed to the cause specifically. I look forward to the discussion in the space below:

*Image: "There - Just There" by Charles Strebor via Creative Commons 

Tags: Darwin, Enchanted Braid, chapter, reading, summarization, summary, visual summary, writing

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I just loved the fact that Darwin was a little scientist even as a kid. I love that he went anywhere and everywhere. Megan'.  right when she says it would have been more intriguing living when he did. He went anywhere he dang well pleased, he learned by experience, not in a cooped up class room like we do. He learned things that meant a lot to him and he had the choice to. He also became friends with his mentor. I would have loved to be able to travel the world, one day at a time, taking it all in. We get a small slice of that. The reason Darwin figured this all out was because he took his time, he made it happen and he had experience with it.

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I was so very deeply intrigued by this chapter, mostly in part because I am fascinated by the "little things" just like Darwin, but also because of the journey that the proving of his theory took. Darwin had the whole world ahead of him to explore, like Megan was quick to point out. His opportunity for discovery was endless, and he knew it, and it drove him to find and prove all that he possibly could. I agree with Maddy in that both the lack of technology helped and hurt him. It helped him because he had to find his own ways to test and prove his theories, which led to many more discoveries in nature and of his heart even. It hurt him because he could not prove his theory in which basalt lay under the ocean's floor, but it was remarkable to the science world that he was so positive that it existed, especially when it was proven true. That kind of faith is remarkable and inspiring.

What intrigued me the most was what Darwin was actually so intrigued by: corals. Never before have I been taught that that was what he truly loved to study. I was able to relate to him in his fascination with something so seemingly unimportant because I too am drawn in by little things. Darwin was interested in learning the beginning fiber of coral reefs and their ecosystems, and it starts with zooplankton and corals- tiny creatures in a large network of fascinating organisms. It's the little things that are very important because they play a much larger role than perceived at first glance.

In my presentation, I took words and phrases that stuck out to me to tell the story of Darwin's journey, and the proving of his theory.

http://www.haikudeck.com/p/HjNLgOsJYo
The way this assignment is set up i think that it helped because it forced you to pay attention to what you were reading and analyze it. When I first read this chapter I was really excited because when I think of Darwin I think of exploration, discoveries, and adventure. During this chapter I thought it would be really interesting to go back and live when Darwin did. Making g new discoveries and changing the way people think. But that can still happen today. People are making discoveries all the time. And back when Darwin was a live they were still trying to classify animals. Today have a huge advantage with all the knowledge we know from the past. Darwin literally changed the way of thinking. He had many theories but the book talks about his theory of coral reefs and how they are formed.
My Haiku deck shows that Darwin had this theory and how it changed the world. Darwin was ahead of his time. Its hard to imagine just what it was like I the 1830s. When I think of that time period I cat possibly picture someone figuring all of that out, it took a hundred years for his theory to be proved right and the only way to do that was to drill into coral reefs and go down over 4,000 ft. Once it was proven it changed the world. It led to the building of the H bomb. Because they needed to find out if Enewetak's geology was stable enough and because of that it not only changed the way of thinking but also the world.


View the assignment here: http://www.haikudeck.com/p/RScGWCOvIl

Darwin was an amazing scientist even as a boy. In he aria life was hard for a scientist. No one would believe most of the things you would say until later on when someone went back and really looked into it. Just thinking about how smart he really was makes be feel really…dumb.

            I found out later in the chapter that Darwin was interested by the corals was interesting. I didn’t know that they didn’t have snorkels to help them dive back then so just knowing they Darwin found out that coral dies at a curtain depth is amazing for one man to figure out. When I look at things I don’t think about why or how or even when this came around I just think about how cool it looks and I wonder but I move on Darwin did not and if it wasn’t for him I don’t think anyone would have figured out what we do know about the ocean today.

            When I was reading this chapter about Darwin and how he “collected and preserved specimens of beetles, butterflies, rocks, fish, and birds” (25) It reminded me of Upward Bound Math and Science. I go there every summer and one year we learned about Darwin and how he was starting to understand revolution with the birds on the islands. The birds were different. Some were big, small, brown, black, etc. Like anywhere else in the world birds are different, but what he saw wasn’t just different birds but some birds are built differently. The birds changed to their environment depending on what kind of food there was. Some birds had only nuts, nectar, fruit, or bugs. Darwin figured this out. He was a true scientist, and a good one at that.

This is the article about the finches I was talking about

http://goo.gl/VugTP

I forgot to add this 

http://goo.gl/FnLf1 

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Shelby Mills posted a discussion

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Apr 15, 2013
Rylee Hanlan replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Mar 18, 2013
Jaycen LeeAnn Wilson replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Mar 18, 2013
MacKinzie Lillian Conard replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Rylee Hanlan replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Mar 18, 2013
Shelby Mills replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Mar 18, 2013
Lindsay Doolan replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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Mar 17, 2013
Lindsay Doolan replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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McCabe Davis replied to Sean Nash's discussion The Outer Strands
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