SaintJoe H2O

NaKeisha Ekpe
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  • Saint Joseph, MO
  • United States
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NaKeisha Ekpe's Page

Latest Activity

NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"Will you show me how to do this in our last hour today???...Please:)"
Nov 1, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"I'm having trouble finding my server????"
Nov 1, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe posted a status
"Marine Biology"
Oct 28, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"I tried to download Evernote app from Appstore.We use this site in my classes to create notes. Having it as an app instead of repeating typing up the address would be helpful,BUT...."
Oct 28, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"I like Miles idea. I would like to access all the information i need for class from one place, like these laptops. It would be much easier. Teachers wouldn't get the many excuses they hear day to day such as "I forgot my book",…"
Oct 28, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"Yes from school, should have read her reply :)"
Oct 28, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe replied to Sean Nash's discussion Feedback Regarding Connected Learning in the group 2011-2012 Students
"Today at school my laptop worked fine.When i was using wifi outside of school, trying to join other networks a message popped up "unable to connect session timed out""
Oct 26, 2011
NaKeisha Ekpe is now a member of SaintJoe H2O
Oct 24, 2011

Profile Information

High School:
Benton
My favorite subject during the regular school day is:
Marketing Internship
Extracurricular activities I am involved in at school:
Drama/Debate
Deca
Soccer

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WATER...

warm

tropical

water

flowing

ever

so slowly

...northward

About

Sean Nash created this Ning Network.

Latest Activity

Jonathan Stickler posted discussions
Apr 11
Jackson Stickler is now a member of SaintJoe H2O
Mar 31
Carol Conard left a comment for Jackson Stickler
"Let me know if this works…."
Mar 21
Rylee Hanlan left a comment for Carol Conard
"Of course!! :) I could never forget! I logged back onto this website to go through my journal entries from the trip for my senior scrapbook! Good times! I wish I could go again & I can't wait to hear how it goes this year! :) "
Mar 20
Carol Conard left a comment for Rylee Hanlan
"Remember what you were doing almost a year ago:)  Mrs. C"
Mar 20
Elsie Barry posted a discussion

Chapter 10

So for the first 6 pages or so, I skimmed it because none of it was about marine biology. But then I realized that it's about the corals and their danger. It made me sad to see how badly overpopulated Jakarta was/is, and every time I hear something about the destruction of nature because of human carelessness makes me mad. It makes me mad how people can't comprehend that they just destroyed a million-year-old animals and not it's not there any more. Ugh.See More
Mar 1
Maria Mills posted discussions
Feb 24
Saige Sheets posted a status
"I am on a roll! I'm glad I put notes in the book to go back and do these Discussions!"
Feb 10
Saige Sheets posted discussions
Feb 10
Elsie Barry posted a discussion

Chapter 9 reflection

Once I looked at the quote at the beginning of the chapter, I knew the chapter was going to be about turtles. It made me happy.I feel like the sea turtle is the type of animal that we would know a lot about, rather than being "an enigma to biologists." But apparently there's a "lost year(s)" and that's so weird. It's also interesting how sea turtles avoid bright lights. It makes sense though, because if it's in the light it's visible to other predators. I feel that the turtle get lost in their…See More
Feb 9
Carol Conard left a comment for Shamari robbs
"Welcome Sharmari!"
Feb 9
Shamari robbs is now a member of SaintJoe H2O
Feb 9
Carol Conard left a comment for Saige Sheets
"Finally!  LOL"
Feb 9
Sean Nash's 5 discussions were featured
Feb 6
Saige Sheets posted a status
"Yay! Mrs. Conard be proud! I am finally on! now... time to post a ton about chapter reading.."
Feb 2
Saige Sheets updated their profile
Feb 2
Maria Mills posted a discussion

The Enchanted Braid-Chapter 8 Reflection

That William Shakespeare passage at the beginning of the chapter really caught my attention: "Why, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones."  I find it eerily true... (What a world we live in!)  And the way the author described the fossilized "Bolca fishes" as being "like flowers carefully pressed and dried between the pages of a book" is just beautiful!  He uses so much detail, giving us insight into how well preserved these creatures must be.  The author is always so good at…See More
Jan 27
Elsie Barry posted a discussion

Chapter 8 reflection

I searched up pictures of the Bolca fishes and holy crap. The fishes are so well-preserved and you can see every tiny bone in their body. The details on their dorsal fins are so defined, it looks like someone carved it out. The fact that "there is little difference between this fossil snapshot and a real one of coral reef fishes today" is incredibly cool. Considering the Bolca fishes were around about 50 million years ago, it's hard to believe that there's little indifference. Normally we would…See More
Jan 25
Carol Conard posted a discussion

The Enchanted Braid Chapter 8 Fish Stories

Remember to follow proper protocol while writing your reflection to Fish Stories.  Feel free to provide feedback to other post.  See More
Jan 23
Carol Conard left a comment for Jonathan Stickler
"Can't wait to hear your thoughts on the Enchanted Braid!"
Jan 13

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from ScienceDaily:

Microscopic organism plays a big role in ocean carbon cycling

Scientists have taken a leap forward in understanding the microscopic underpinnings of the ocean carbon cycle by pinpointing a bacterium that appears to play a dominant role in carbon consumption.

Some corals adjusting to rising ocean temperatures

Scientists have revealed how some corals can quickly switch on or off certain genes in order to survive in warmer-than-average tidal waters. To most people, 86-degree Fahrenheit water is pleasant for bathing and swimming. To most sea creatures, however, it's deadly. As climate change heats up ocean temperatures, the future of species such as coral, which provides sustenance and livelihoods to a billion people, is threatened.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity: One species, a few drops of seawater, hundreds of coexisting subpopulations

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live in the oceans, forming the base of the marine food chain and occupying a range of ecological niches based on temperature, light and chemical preferences, and interactions with other species. But the full extent and characteristics of diversity within this single species remains a puzzle.

Hydrothermal vents: How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, the so-called 'black smokers,' are fascinating geological formations. They are home to unique ecosystems, but are also potential suppliers of raw materials for the future. They are driven by volcanic 'power plants' in the seafloor. But how exactly do they extract their energy from the volcanic rock?

Two new river turtle species described

The alligator snapping turtle is the largest river turtle in North America, weighing in at up to 200 pounds and living almost a century. Now researchers have discovered that it is not one species -- but three. By examining museum specimens and wild turtles, the scientists uncovered deep evolutionary divisions in this ancient reptile.

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